Key data: mortality

Statistics on mortality

Compiled by Men’s Health Forum, December 2014. Revised January 2017.

Summary

  • The mortality rates in England and Wales for males were 1,156.4 deaths per 100,000 population and for females 863.8 deaths per 100,000.
  • In the UK one man in five (19%) dies before the age of 65.
  • The biggest single cause of death in men is cancer. The second major cause of death for men was circulatory diseases.

Mortality

Mortality rates are higher for men than women.

  • In 2015, the age-standardised mortality rates (ASMRs) in England and Wales for males and females were 1,156.4 and 863.8 deaths per 100,000 population respectively. (Reference: ONS)
  • Compared to 2014, this is an increase of 3.1% for males and 5.1% for females after several years of falling ASMRs. (With the exception of 2015, mortality rates have generally been decreasing. Between 2002 and 2012 age-standardised mortality rates for males and females declined by 24% and 19% respectively. (Reference: ONS)
  • Male mortality rates were higher than females throughout the 10 year period to 2012, but because rates for males fell at a faster rate, the gap between male and female mortality decreased (Reference: ONS).

Premature mortality

Men are more likely than women to die prematurely. (Reference: ONS).

  • In England and Wales, 19% of all male deaths were aged under 65 (women 12%) and 38% of all male deaths were aged under 75 (women 26%) 
  • Males are more likely than females to die in all age groups under 85 years.
    • The most noticeable gap is in the 15-34 age group. In England and Wales in 2015, 1.65% of all male deaths were in this group compared to 0.75% of all female deaths. Of total deaths in this age group, two-thirds (67%) were male. 

Causes of death

The biggest single cause of death in men (and women) is cancer. It was 31% of all male deaths and 25% of all female deaths registered in 2015. (Reference: ONS)

  • In England and Wales in 2012, the age-standardised male mortality rate for cancer was 340.5 per 100,000 population. 
  • The second major cause of death for men was circulatory diseases (319.4 per 100,000) and the third was respiratory diseases (171.1 per 100,000)