Organisational focus across the whole health system

MEN'S HEALTH MANIFESTO: Support change on the ground – training, leadership, incentives, process and policy
  • National Men’s Health Policy (as in Ireland and Australia) – especially a national strategy for improving the mental health of men and boys
  • Assign responsibility for men’s health and set up men’s health champions in local & national organisations – and in every GP practice
  • Include men’s and boy’s health in all health professional, psychology and PSHE teacher training
  • Include mental health in legal, policing and other front-line service training
  • Support professional development regarding men’s health including communication, targeting and service design – with particular focus on ‘difficult issues’ (eg. mental health/erectile dysfunction/weight etc.)
  • Align health system incentives – including a fair QOF allocation by gender 
  • More personal commissioning and budgeting to enable men to drive change and have services that meet their personal needs
  • Government support to persuade the World Health Organisation (WHO) to include men’s health as a priority
  • Have a joined up local men’s and boys’ health policy and plan – reflect it in the strategy. 

Why is this important?

  • Initial evidence from Ireland is that having a men’s health policy is making a difference.
  • Stakeholders have been very clear that a barrier to improving men’s health is lack of organisational focus and training for practitioners.
  • Local areas with the worst male life expectancy are no more likely to address this in their local health statistics assessment, their JSNA, than are areas with the best male health outcomes.

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